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Go Recursion Functions


Recursion Functions

Go accepts recursion functions. A function is recursive if it calls itself and reaches a stop condition.

In the following example, testcount() is a function that calls itself. We use the x variable as the data, which increments with 1 (x + 1) every time we recurse. The recursion ends when the x variable equals to 11 (x == 11). 

Example

package main
import ("fmt")

func testcount(x int) int {
  if x == 11 {
    return 0
  }
  fmt.Println(x)
  return testcount(x + 1)
}

func main(){
  testcount(1)
}

RResult:

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Try it Yourself »

Recursion is a common mathematical and programming concept. This has the benefit of meaning that you can loop through data to reach a result.

The developer should be careful with recursion functions as it can be quite easy to slip into writing a function which never terminates, or one that uses excess amounts of memory or processor power. However, when written correctly recursion can be a very efficient and mathematically-elegant approach to programming.

In the following example, factorial_recursion() is a function that calls itself. We use the x variable as the data, which decrements (-1) every time we recurse. The recursion ends when the condition is not greater than 0 (i.e. when it is 0).

Example

package main
import ("fmt")


func factorial_recursion(x float64) (y float64) {
  if x > 0 {
     y = x * factorial_recursion(x-1)
  } else {
     y = 1
  }
  return
}

func main() {
  fmt.Println(factorial_recursion(4))
}

Result:

24
Try it Yourself »

To a new developer it can take some time to work out how exactly this works, best way to find out is by testing and modifying it.